The Factory

Culture Industry is the idea that messages distributed through world-wide creative mediums is created, united, and regulated by the elite for the general public digestion. Mediums such as television, film, and radio must adhere to these ideas that are deemed easily digested by the public. Anything outside of these constraints, can be deemed a failure, and will not fit into the rest of society, if they are ever distributed. This industry feeds off of the rules of supply and demand. The public craves information, even if it is only a fraction of what they could receive, as it is better than receiving none at all. The result, information is pour out of a universal “factory” which can be identical, thus mis-leading, but must be and is accepted, unwillingly at times.

This is, in some way, similar to Herman and Chomsky’s view on the propaganda model.  The Propaganda Model focuses on the principals of regulation being filtered through several vices, which are used a controlling methods by the elite. Propaganda is more economically focused rather than cultural/technologically based. For example, if I were to make a documentary on my hate for vegetables and sold it to be NBC, under the Propaganda model, my message may be never make it to air as advertisers, supermarket tycoons, and Farming Unions would disagree with the message portraying to the public about their product. Not only would this create a potential loss in revenue for NBC, it could also cut important ties. Further, under culture industry, my message does not have the best interest of the masses, and would also be censored, especially if the government had been promoting broccoli.
Mcluthan theory is based more on the message and how it is conveyed through mediums. Propaganda deals more with what messages are chosen to conveyed and who controls these messages. The medium of which it comes through almost seems unimportant compared to filtered message.

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